Saving money and reducing delays

"With the Aircraft De-icing Forecast Service we have proven that winter icing delays can be reduced by 84%" Steve Crawley, bmi

bmi aircraft

Challenge

bmi is part of the Lufthansa group and the second largest airline based at London Heathrow. From their Heathrow hub, bmi operates services in the UK to Europe, the Middle East, Central Asia and Africa.

During cold weather, ice can form on aircraft wings presenting a serious danger to aircraft safety. If ice is present, bmi must de-ice aircraft before take off. bmi needs accurate predictions of when to de-ice in order to improve planning, save unnecessary costs and reduce relays.

Every minute of delay costs on average £50. Costs increase considerably if long flights with connections are delayed, as bmi has to provide hotels, taxis, meals and seats on other carriers if passengers miss their connections. Additionally, the low cost operation has short turnarounds (twenty five minutes) with up to six flights a day, so it is vital the first flight departs on time.

Solution

bmi takes the Met Office's Aircraft De-icing Forecast Service which forecasts aircraft icing conditions worldwide. Our service provides timely de-icing predictive information which enables improved logistical planning.

Our accurate, tailored guides to holdover times, and proactive SMS and email alerts to ground staff enable improved de-icing operations.

Benefits

bmi has 52 de-icing stations around the world to monitor, therefore it finds the help from the Met Office invaluable. By using our service to decide whether to anti-ice an aircraft and protect it during an overnight stop can save bmi in excess of £9,000. Importantly, with our Aircraft De-icing Forecast Service, bmi has reduced winter icing delays by 84%.

Every airline knows that by reducing delays you reduce costs, keep customer satisfaction, and reduce human-factor elements associated with stress and pressure.

Last updated: 7 August 2012

Downloads

  • PDF bmi (PDF, 193 kB)
    Aircraft De-icing Forecast case study