The geography of poverty, disasters and climate extremes in 2030

A crowd of stranded villagers gather on the banks of Ethiopia's Lake Tana. Andrew Heavens, 2006

Natural disasters are a significant threat to countries in poverty. A new study commissioned by the Department for International Development looks at the relationship between a changing climate, disasters and poverty.

Climate change and exposure to natural disasters pose a serious threat to international efforts to eradicate poverty by 2030. As temperatures rise, many of the world's poorest and most vulnerable people could face more intense or lengthy droughts, extreme rainfall and flooding and severe heatwaves. These impacts could threaten lives and livelihoods, as well as the hard-won gains made on poverty in recent decades.

The impoverishing impact of the combination of climate change and natural disasters is so grave that the United Nations Secretary General's High Level Panel (HLP) on Post-2015 Development Goals has suggested a target to be added to the first proposed post-2015 development goal on ending poverty: 'to build resilience and reduce the number of deaths caused by disasters'.

To explore the relationship between poverty and disasters in a changing climate, the Department for International Development (DFID), commissioned a study with project partners - the Overseas Development Institute (ODI), the Met Office and Risk Management Solutions (RMS).

You can download the full project report, The Geography of Poverty, Disasters and Climate Extremes in 2030, and the technical annex from ODI's website.

The document below contains some of the supplementary data generated by the Met Office, on the changing climate hazards in the 2030s: The Geography of Poverty, Disasters and Climate Extremes in 2030 The Geography of Poverty, Disasters and Climate Extremes in 2030 (PDF, 5 MB)

Last updated: 16 October 2013