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November 2006

The averaging period used for the following assessment was 1961-1990.

UK overview

Mean temperatures generally 1 to 2 °C above average across the UK for November, which confirmed the warmest autumn for all districts and regions (areal series back to 1914). The majority of the UK experienced above-average rainfall. Scotland W district area, experienced its wettest November, with some stations recording well over double the average rainfall. Sunshine levels exceptionally above average across much of the UK with some records being set for sunniest November. However, sunshine was below average across some western areas of Scotland.

England diary of highlights

Mean temperatures above average, completing a record-breaking autumn for warmth. Rainfall generally close to or above average, although some parts of southern England received well above average rainfall. Sunshine was also exceptionally above average.

1st to 5th: High pressure soon became established over the British Isles. There were some sharp frosts overnight, with Benson (Oxfordshire) falling to -5.2 °C on the 2nd, but there was also plenty of sunshine. Hastings (Sussex) reported 8.9 hours on the 3rd. The high moved south and it became rather warmer, Torquay (Devon) reaching 15.7 °C on the 5th.

6th and 7th: The high was slowly declining and edging southwards. The dominant feature was dense fog over southern England and the Midlands. The fog persisted around Bristol on the 6th and there were some marked temperature differences - a sunny Saunton Sands (Devon) reached 15 °C while a foggy Brize Norton (Oxfordshire) only managed 6 °C. The weather over the north became cloudy with outbreaks of rain and quite windy.

8th to 10th: Cloudy and dull at first with outbreaks of rain, though very mild in the south-west. Cloud slowly became more broken and the 9th was mostly dry, with plenty of sunshine in the south. After a chilly night, cloud increased, with rain and freshening winds across the north.

11th to 15th: It was frequently cloudy and steadily became wetter in most places and remained generally very mild. There was a lot of sunshine on the 11th after the clearance of overnight rain, though there were showers in the north-west. Thereafter, only the south-east saw any significant sunshine, while it was often drizzly in the west. The minimum temperature at St Catherine's Point (Isle of Wight) on the 13th was 12.7 °C while the daytime maximum was 16.9 °C in Bournemouth (Dorset).

16th to 19th: This was an unsettled spell with frequent heavy rain or squally showers and strong winds. Brockenhurst (Hampshire) recorded 17.4 mm in an hour on the 17th and there was a 50-knot gust over the south coast the same day. It became steadily colder and there was a frost in the north on the morning of the 19th - a rather drier and brighter day with scattered showers in the south-west.

20th to 30th: Low pressure dominated the weather and there were frequent spells of heavy rain or showers accompanied by strong to gale-force winds. There were brighter interludes on the 24th and 26th, while on the 25th, a tornado was reported in Hampshire.

Wales diary of highlights

Mean temperatures above average, completing a record-breaking autumn for warmth. Sunshine was exceptionally above average, but rainfall was also above average.

1st to 5th: High pressure soon became established over the British Isles. There were some sharp frosts overnight, with Sennybridge (Powys) falling to -6.6 °C on the 3rd, but there was also plenty of sunshine. The high moved south and it became rather warmer, Mumbles Head (near Swansea) reaching 13.9 °C on the 5th.

6th and 7th: The high was slowly declining and edging southwards. The dominant feature was dense fog over parts of Wales, chiefly the south-east. The fog persisted around Cardiff on the 6th and there were some marked temperature differences. The weather over the north became cloudy with outbreaks of rain and quite windy.

8th to 10th: Cloudy and dull for a time, with outbreaks of rain, though very mild. Cloud slowly became more broken on the 9th when it became mostly dry, with plenty of sunshine. After a chilly night, cloud and wind increased across the north.

11th to 15th: It was frequently cloudy and steadily became wetter, though remaining very mild. There was a lot of sunshine on the 11th after the clearance of overnight rain, but thereafter, it was often drizzly on western coasts and hills.

16th to 19th: This was an unsettled spell with frequent heavy rain or squally showers and strong winds. It became steadily colder, with a ground frost in the north on the morning of the 19th - a rather drier and brighter day with scattered showers.

20th to 30th: Low pressure dominated the weather and there were frequent spells of heavy rain or showers accompanied by strong to gale-force winds. There were brighter interludes on the 24th and 26th.

Scotland diary of highlights

Mean temperatures above average, completing a record-breaking autumn for warmth. A very wet month over much of western Scotland with some stations recording well over double the average rainfall.

A mainly dry a settled start to the month with a large area of high pressure over the Atlantic building south-east into the Irish Sea. However, Wick reported 13.6 mm of rain between 0400 and 0900 on Thursday 2nd.

The high then declined south with strengthening westerly airstream become established. Some patchy rain developed on Saturday 4th as cold front pushed through. Rain and occasional gales affected the Northern Isles on the 5th and 6th, the rain becoming more extensive and widespread on Tuesday 7th as a cold front moved south. Aberdeen saw a daytime maximum of only 4 °C.

The more-persistent rain cleared south on the 8th as a showery north-westerly airstream became established. The showers and strong north-westerly winds mainly confined to the north and north-east of the country on the 9th with pressure building from the west. Friday 10th saw weather fronts sweep east through the country bringing rain and strong to gale-force west or sout-west winds, clearing to showers later in the day. The showers turned to snow over the mountains on the 11th but gradually died out from the west. A deep Atlantic low pushed further weather fronts into the country on Sunday 12th bringing cloud and rain, the rain becoming heavy and persistent in the west.

A strong, mild westerly airstream on the 13th brought frequent blustery showers to the west, while the east was mainly dry and sunny. The 14th was showery in many places, these heaviest over Shetland. On the 15th cloud and rain spread slowly north across the country. Some heavy falls occurred, especially in the south, with Glasgow Bishopton recording a 24-hour total of 34 mm.

A showery south-westerly airflow affected the country on the 16th. Most of the showers fell in the north and west before a band of heavier rain pushed north-east overnight. This gave Shetland a wet day on the 17th with 15 mm recorded, while remaining areas became brighter with showers, these falling as snow on high ground. The 18th was also bright with sunshine and scattered showers, falling as snow on high ground, and a touch of frost early and late.

After a mainly dry start on the 19th cloud and heavy rain spread north along with strengthening south to south-easterly gales. The deep low responsible passed close to the north-west on the 20th bringing showers or longer spells of rain and strong to gale south-west winds. Glasgow recorded a total of 63 mm over these two days. The 21st turned brighter with showers and winds eased later. A band of rain spread north on the 22nd though winds were much lighter. On the 23rd another deep low moved east across the Highlands bringing rain, showers and strong winds, especially to the south. A warm front moved north on the 24th bringing some rain, while the 25th was showery especially in the south-west. A transient ridge brought a rare dry day on the 26th though rain spread to the south overnight. This cleared north-east on the 27th with sunshine and showers following until the 29th, though gales affected the north-west. Rain become persistent and heavy in the west on the 30th, with Glasgow recording 57 mm. Gales were severe over the Hebrides and the west coast.

Northern Ireland diary of highlights

Mean temperatures above average, completing a record-breaking autumn for warmth. Above average rainfall and sunshine.

The 1st to 6th was generally a settled, and increasingly mild period, with overnight frosts on the 1st and 2nd. There were good sunny spells and just a little rain, mainly in the north.

During the evening of the 6th a front bought rain across the country introducing a generally cloudy spell of weather with outbreaks of rain or showers, and some strong winds, which lasted through until the 12th. The rain was mainly light, although Ballypatrick saw 10 mm on the 8th, and it was mild with temperatures reaching 13 °C on the 8th and 10th.

The 13th and 14th saw showers, especially the north and west, and clear or sunny spells. The wind was also strong at times.

A cloudy and wet day followed on the 15th with eastern parts seeing the heaviest rain, 36.6 mm fell at Killowen and 34.6 mm at Katesbridge, followed by a more showery day with sunny spells on the 16th.

The 17th was colder with outbreaks of rain turning to sleet at low levels during the morning before a drier afternoon with just isolated showers. The 18th was cold and showery, falling as sleet and snow over the hills, and a frost developing overnight.

The 19th became milder but rain spread east during the morning with strong to gale-force southerly winds for a time, before it became more showery during the evening. Further showery and windy days followed on the 20th and 21st.

From the 22nd to the 24th there were outbreaks of occasionally heavy rain, the 23rd being particularly windy with a gust of 52 knots at Killowen.

A windy and mild spell of weather began on the 25th lasting through until 29th, with sunny spells and scattered showers. Temperatures reached 13 °C on the 27th and 29th with a gust of 49 knots reported at Glenanne on the 27th.

The 30th was generally a wet day with around 15 mm of rain falling quite widely and strong to gale-force southerly winds, Ballykelly reporting gusts of up to 51 knots.



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