Alasdair Skea

Alasdair Skea

Alasdair leads the Renewables Applications team which develops and delivers products to help our customers manage the impact of weather on their renewable energy business.

The team works on developing a range of services in this sector which include operational forecasting and our site-screening and wind assessment tool, Virtual Met Mast™. This solution uses an advanced modelling technique which provides high quality assessments of site suitability by providing site-specific wind climatology at proposed turbine or wind farm locations, with the ability to set parameters to take account of local conditions.

Alasdair also manages a programme of scientific research and technical developments, utilising the Met Office's world-leading scientific capability, to increase the efficiency of the production process and provide the best quality service to our customers.

Career background and experience

Alasdair joined the Met Office in 2002 as a research scientist after finishing a degree in physics at Durham University. Following this, Alasdair completed an MSc in Weather, Climate and Numerical modelling at the University of Reading whilst working in the local forecasting research and development group.

Alasdair's previous experience has focussed on developing techniques to add site-specific forecast skill to our Numerical Weather Prediction (NWP) model output and on developing bespoke products and services for the Met Office's customers. In particular Alasdair was responsible for the maintenance and development of the Met Office Road Surface Temperature model (MORST), which is the primary data source for the OpenRoad product.

"In the wind energy sector it's crucial for all-scales of projects to have the most accurate data on which to base business decisions. To ensure we are providing the best possible wind intelligence to our customers another priority area for our team is continually analysing results and verifying outputs against other approaches to steer improvements and developments."

Last updated: 15 October 2013