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Sheffield

  • Averages table
  • Averages graphs
  • Location comparison
  • Climate station map
  • Averages maps

Averages table

The averages table shows the latest set of 30-year averages, covering the period 1981-2010, for the nearest / most similar climate station to your chosen location. The other tabs show averages tables for districts, regions and the UK, covering the periods 1961-1990, 1971-2000 and 1981-2010.

Averages graphs

The graph provides an alternative representation of the average data for your chosen location. By moving your mouse cursor over the graph you can see the average figures for your chosen climate variable for each month.

Location comparison

The comparison graphs enable you to compare the averages for two chosen locations. For example, you can see if one location is, on average, significantly warmer, drier, or sunnier than the other.

Location Details

Sheffield

Location: 53.3809, -1.4686

Altitude: 84m above mean sea level

Climate station map

The climate station map shows around 300 stations across the UK for which 1981-2010 averages are available. By clicking on one of the sites you will be taken to the table of available data.

Averages maps

These maps enable you to view maps of monthly, seasonal and annual averages for the UK or your selected region. The analyses are based on 1 km grid-point data sets which are derived from station data. UK maps are available for the averaging periods 1961-1990, 1971-2000 and 1981-2010. Regional maps are only available for the period 1971-2000.

Sheffield information

Known commonly as the Steel City, Sheffield in South Yorkshire is at the very heart of the UK.

The city of Sheffield is known throughout the world as the home of steel, with the city a vital part of Britain’s industrial past.

By the 16th century, the water powered blade workshops meant that Sheffield was the main producer of cutlery for England outside of London and in the mid-17th century, a technique for fusing a thin layer of silver to copper was invented and soon became known as the Sheffield plate. In the late 20th century, Sheffield’s economy started to change dramatically and today, the city is at the forefront of the technology services sector.

Retail is also at the heart of Sheffield’s economy, with the Meadowhall shopping centre attracting visitors from across the region.

The city offers a variety of things to do and see, the most noted being their heritage and culture attractions. Sheffield Botanical Gardens boasts 19 acres of Grade II listed land showcasing a glass roofed pavilion and 5,500 different species of plants, all kew styled by the 19th Century landscaper Robert Marnock. Sheffield’s boundaries share more than a third with the Peak District, meaning that opportunities for hiking the beautiful English countryside to all visitors are right on the city’s doorstep.

Heritage architecture is another key attraction in Sheffield, with offerings such as the Abbeydale Industrial Hamlet, Shepherd Wheel and Beauchief Abbey bringing tourists to the city. Many of these attractions hold working monuments of Sheffield’s history and detailed information on how the city expanded during the industrial revolution.

Sheffield is a key centre for sport in the UK, with Sheffield Wednesday and Sheffield United enjoying an intense local rivalry. The city also hosted the 1991 World Student Games at the Don Valley Stadium and, most recently, the city was put on the sporting map by the gold medal winning performance of Jessica Ennis.

Def Leppard and the Arctic Monkeys are amongst the names that have put Sheffield on the music map and every July, the city dances to the beat of the Tramlines Festival — a free festival that sees live bands take to the stage throughout the city.