Work Package 5: Climate Services


Climate services provide climate information in a way that assists decision-making by individuals and organisations.  Such services are essential for society to better manage the risks and opportunities arising from climate variability and change. Climate services bridge the gap between the information developed by scientists and service providers and the practical needs of climate-sensitive decision-makers in government, industry and society.  The services facilitate climate-smart decision-making for example to mitigate the impacts of climate-related disasters, and improve food, water and energy security outcomes.

The key aspects of work package 5 are:

  • Integrate all activities across the CSSP, enabling the pull-through of science developed in the other work packages by developing prototypes of climate services for key sectors, and feeding key end user requirements back into the underpinning research.
  • Develop the national climate service frameworks in both China and the UK and improve the understanding of who the users of climate services are in both countries and the requirements of different groups.
  • Develop applied science and prototype climate services for priority sectors, including energy, agriculture and food security, water resource management, and urban environments (which are well aligned with the UN's Global Framework for Climate Services).
  • Develop translational Science - a multidisciplinary approach to produce useable and useful knowledge and applications to bridge the gap between climate science and societal user of climate information.  This will be done through improved understanding of the interests of stakeholders in climate services in China and the communication of climate information.

Summary of ongoing work at the Met Office with Chinese partners

Year one work has focussed on understanding the current state of climate services in China and the UK in collaboration with CMA. A road map for the remainder of the project has scoped out activities that would help build the National Climate Services, and arrangements have been made for bi-lateral visits and knowledge exchange.

Some scoping studies have been undertaken in year one focussing on climate services for the energy sector (with CMA) and urban environments (with CMA and others in China), the latter being done via sub-contract. Both pieces of work have included a thorough investigation of current science and services available and the requirements for services from the user community in each country. Underpinning research has begun to advance the ability of scientists in China and UK to provide prototype services to meet these requirements in later years.

Work on translational science has also been done by sub-contract. This has involved engagement in China with a variety of stakeholders and has focussed on evaluating the distance between need and availability of climate science between the different groups. This work has already provided many useful insights which will help to inform activities for the remainder of the project.

Last updated: 27 February 2015

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