Climate bulletin - April 2014

Summary of the world's climate in April 2014.

The global average temperature for April 2014 was 0.64 ± 0.16 °C above the 1961-1990 average. Sea-surface temperatures (SSTs) in the Tropical Pacific remained close to the long-term average. Below the surface, water temperatures in the Tropical Pacific were above average from the dateline to the coast of South America.

During April, the global average air temperature over land was warmer than the long-term average (1.05 ± 0.30 °C). North Africa and the Middle East, Australia, New Zealand, Europe, and east Asia were significantly warmer than the long term mean. Areas of significant cold were less widespread with the region to the north west of the Great Lakes being significantly colder than average.

SSTs were generally warmer than average in March (0.48 ± 0.09 °C). Large areas of unusual warmth were recorded in the north-east Pacific, parts of the North Atlantic, Indian Ocean, South Atlantic, Mediterranean and western tropical Pacific. Areas of unusually cold waters were more limited. An area of the north Atlantic was unusually cold including a region between 60 and 20 °W at the same latitude as Ireland. Other areas of unusually cold sea-surface temperatures were the southwest Atlantic around 60°S, and limited areas in the north west Pacific.

Parts of the Tropical Pacific were also unusually cold, but observations from this region have been less reliable in recent months due to the failure of a number moored buoys in the TAO/TRITON array.

In the southern hemisphere, the sea ice surrounding Antarctica reached a record extent for April. The ice was particularly extensive (relative to the long term mean) in the Weddell Sea sector.

Last updated: 24 June 2014