Dr Cristina Charlton-Perez

Cristina works on high-resolution data assimilation with a specific focus on model cloud microphysics.

Current activities

Cristina is a senior scientist working on high-resolution data assimilation and nowcasting in order to improve the Unified Model's ability to simulate weather phenomena on fine spatial scales, currently on a 1.5 km scale.  She is investigating the potential benefits of using ceilometer backscatter observations as a new observation in the DA system.  She is collaborating on a project to include radar reflectivity in the DA system. Her work contributes to her team's focus on shaping the future of the Met Office Nowcasting system and other convection-permitting, high resolution numerical weather prediction models.

Cristina is part of the Weather Science Data Assimilation and Ensembles group at the Met Office. Cristina is responsible for improving the representation of cloud microphysics in the perturbation forecast model. This model is an essential part of the Met Office's DA system. If this model can simulate the cloud microphysics better, then its simulation of precipitation could be improved as well and the DA system could then make better use of observations of cloud and precipitation. Atmospheric backscatter and radar reflectivity are observations which could aid forecasting of cloud and precipitation at convective scales.

Because Cristina is a member of the MetOffice@Reading, she aims to collaborate with Exeter colleagues and University of Reading colleagues on many aspects of her work. She attends meetings of the Microphysics Working Group in Exeter and the  High Resolution Atmospheric Assimilation Group in Reading.

Career background

Cristina has been a member of the MetOffice@Reading since starting at the Met Office in 2008. Prior to joining the Met Office, Cristina worked as post-doctoral research scientist first at  Columbia University in New York and then jointly at the  University of Leeds and UCL. In her past work she designed and built a high-resolution model of ship plume chemistry and dynamics and worked on problems in tropical convection. She earned both an MSc and a PhD in Applied Mathematics at the University of Colorado, Boulder. Her thesis topic was on the simulation of interannual variability and intraseasonal variability in the tropical Pacific atmosphere and ocean with a focus on El Nino Southern Oscillation (ENSO).

At the Met Office, Cristina has so far focused on developing code to incorporate radar reflectivity observations in data assimilation in the highest resolution versions of the . However, Cristina's main interest lies in creating an improved treatment of cloud microphysics in the Perturbation Forecast model within the Unified Model.

At the Met Office, Cristina has worked on developing code to incorporate radar reflectivity observations in data assimilation in the highest resolution versions of the Unified Model. Cristina is also interested in creating an improved treatment of cloud microphysics in the Perturbation Forecast model within the Unified Model. Currently, Cristina is working on creating a forward model for atmospheric backscatter and a real-time monitoring system for this observation type.

Last updated: 9 April 2014

About Dr. Cristina Charlton-Perez

Dr Cristina Charlton-Perez

Cristina Charlton-Perez

Cristina's areas of expertise include:

  • Atmospheric convection
  • Data assimilation
  • Cloud microphysics

Cristina's publications