Clive Pierce

Clive develops high-resolution precipitation nowcasting and NWP post-processing algorithms for fluvial and pluvial flood forecasting and warning.

Areas of expertise

  • Nowcasting 
  • NWP post-processing
  • Precipitation  
  • Weather radar 
  • Project Management

My Publications - Pierce, C

Current activities

The current focus of Clive's work is on the quantification of uncertainty in high resolution precipitation nowcasts and forecasts and the use of this uncertainty to improve fluvial and pluvial flood forecasts and warnings. He has developed a stochastic precipitation nowcast model known as STEPS in collaboration with scientists in the Met Office's Ensemble Forecasting Research team, hydrologists working at the CAWCR and the Environment Agency. STEPS is implemented within the Met Office's post-processing system.

Clive is managing follow-on R&D with the aim of generating a seamless, high resolution ensemble precipitation forecast with a range of five days. This will be used to improve the accuracy and extend the range of pluvial and fluvial flood warnings issued by the Flood Forecasting Centre (FFC). Several algorithms similar in design to STEPS have been developed to this end. These incorporate ensemble generation and statistical downscaling capabilities and are designed to integrate ensemble precipitation nowcasts with ensemble NWP precipitation forecasts from convection permitting and global configurations of MOGREPS.

Clive is also exploring wider applications of these algorithms, including the downscaling of precipitation forecasts from climate prediction models.

Career background

Clive joined the Met Office in 1993 having previously worked as a research scientist at the universities of East Anglia and Birmingham, and briefly, as a meteorologist in Scotland. In the Met Office he has worked in a variety of research and development areas including weather radar and forecasting research.  

External recognition

  •  Sub-Editor of Weather, Royal Meteorological Society, 1997-2002

Last updated: 8 April 2014