Dr Jeremy Price

Jeremy's main responsibility is to design, organise and run the Met Office boundary layer observational research programme in support of developing better Met Office weather services.

Areas of expertise:

  • Boundary layer meteorology and observations, including clouds, fog, and stable boundary layers;

  • Designing and running observational campaigns.

Publications by Jeremy

Current activities

Jeremy works as a Scientific Manager in Observation Based Research, located at their out-station in Cardington, Bedfordshire. Currently his responsibilities are:

  • Maintaining and developing the field site at Cardington;
  • Running the observational boundary layer research programme;
  • Managing instrument development projects;
  • Fostering collaboration with other research institutes.

Specific research areas:

  • Managing the observational component of COLPEX, a field experiment to examine cold pooling of air and fog formation in a region of hilly terrain;
  • Fog formation, evolution and dissipation, with an interest in correctly predicting stability and turbulence in radiation fog;
  • Boundary layer clouds. In particular, stratus, stratocumulus, and cumulus spreading into stratocumulus. Studying cloud evolution and the relation between humidity distributions and cloud fraction;
  • Stable boundary layers;
  • Instrument development, including turbulence probes, and a cloud droplet probe for use on a tethered balloon system;
  • Development of a large autonomous portable meteorological observing station based around a 30m tower using a full suite of research quality measurements capable of continuous operation using its own power source.

Career background

  • PhD in Atmospheric physics studying stratosphere-troposphere exchange in cut-off-low systems;
  • Joined Met Office in 1995, as a Senior Scientific Officer based at Cardington to stratocumulus cloud;
  • Moved to Parametrizations in 2003 working on a new cloud parametrization scheme (PC2);
  • Returned to Cardington Met Research Unit in 2005 to become the new Principal Meteorological Officer.

Last updated: 8 April 2014