Professor John Mitchell

John is Principal Research Fellow, and has 30 years of experience in research on climate change, and served on the Met Office Executive for 7 years. He now advises the Chief Scientist on climate change.

Current activities

John advises the Chief Scientist on issues concerning climate change. This includes keeping a watching brief on climate science internationally, handling concerns of those skeptical about climate change, and working with other Research Fellows to ensure they make an effective contribution to the Met Office research programme, as well as following research interests in climate sensitivity and palaeoclimate.

Career background

John Mitchell gained a BSc Honours degree in Applied Mathematics from The Queen's University Belfast in 1970, and in 1973 he gained a PhD in Theoretical Physics from the same institution. In 1978, he took charge of the Climate Change group in what is now the Met Office's Hadley Centre for Climate Prediction and Research. He was Chief Scientist from 2002 to 2008 and Director of Climate Science from 2008 to 2010. He now works part time as Principal Research Fellow.

External recognition

  • John was awarded an OBE in 2002.

  • John is a Fellow of the Royal Society, a Fellow of the Institute for Mathematics and its Applications, and a Member of the Academia Europaea.

  • John is a Visiting Professor at the University of Reading, and an Honorary Professor at the Universities of East Anglia and Exeter.

  • John has been a lead author in three IPCC Assessments.

  • John has been chair and co-chair of the WCRP Working Group on Coupled Models (2001-2008).

  • John has been a member of WMO Executive Council (2005-2008).

  • John has won numerous awards, including the WMO Norbert Gerbier MUMM International Award (1997 and 1998), the European Geophysical Union Hans Oeschger Medal (2004) , and the Royal Meteorological Society Symons Gold Medal (2011).

Last updated: 4 April 2014

About John Mitchell

Prof John Mitchell

Prof John Mitchell

Areas of expertise include:

  • understanding anthropogenic climate;

  • climate modelling;

  • detection and attribution of climate change

Publications by John