International

CSSP China research opportunities

THE FUNDING OPPORTUNITIES BELOW ARE NOW CLOSED

Call Reference: DN424815

Met Office tendering on behalf of BEIS. 

Funding opportunities for: CSSP China 


To bid for these funds, see notes at the end of this page. 


Please note that these funding opportunities are open to UK researchers only.

Grant Funds for the period April 2020 – March 2021

Call for competition to cover the following lots:  
 

Lot number Title Amount
CHN19/1 Vegetation/crop stress monitoring £250.000

CHN19/2

Attribution of climate change over China and verification of models used for attribution studies £250,000

CHN19/3

Aerosol effects on Chinese regional climate dynamics £300,000

CHN19/4

Dynamics of East Asian monsoon variability and climate change £300,000

CHN19/5

Indian and Pacific Ocean decadal variability, climate change and teleconnections to China £300,000

CHN19/6

The impact of climate change on water resources in China £400,000

CHN19/7

Predicting future climate extremes in China £400,000

CHN19/8

Air-sea interactions, teleconnections and model errors in the east Asian monsoon £300,000

CHN19/9

Aerosol-cloud-land interactions over east Asia and their effects on regional climates £300,000

CHN19/10

Development of an improved urban-environment scheme in global and regional models £300,000

CHN19/11

The dynamics of tropical cyclones during and after land fall £300,000

CHN19/12

Climate-driven staple crop production variability and commodity price response £200,000

CHN19/13

Food system mapping and climate sensitivity, with focus on livestock and marine contributions £300,000

Key dates

Publication of Call: 9 September 2019
(Start of bidding period) 

Call return date: 1 November 2019, 12 noon

Estimated award of call: January 2020

Estimated delivery period: April 2020 – March 2021

 

Background 
The Climate Science for Service Partnership for China (CSSP China), supported by the UK Government’s Newton Fund, is a joint UK-China research programme that aims to help build the basis for services to support climate and weather resilient economic development and social welfare through strong strategic partnerships harnessing UK scientific expertise. 
 
Summary of CSSP China project aims 
CSSP China aims to accelerate climate science R&D programmes to underpin development of climate services that help build resilience to climate vulnerability. Specific project themes include: 

1)    Monitoring, attribution and reanalysis to improve understanding of climate and its short- and long-term variations; 

2)    Global dynamics of climate variability and change with the overall aim of improving regional climate predictions; 

3)    East Asian climate variability and extremes to improve understanding of regional modes of climate variability, their teleconnections and impacts on regional water cycle and climate extremes within East Asia; 

4)    Development of models and climate projection systems to underpin the modelling capability within climate prediction programmes; and 

5)    Climate Services to assist decision-making by individuals and organisations enabling better management of risks and opportunities arising from climate variability and change. 

For further information please visit the project webpage.

 
Lot Details 
CHN19/1: Vegetation/crop stress monitoring
The aim of this activity is to develop a monitoring system suitable for climate services where crops, and potentially other vegetation types, are monitored in real time. The monitoring system is expected to provide information that can be used to improve crop/vegetation health and/or yield, and potentially have economic benefits, for example by reducing water consumption and fertilisation needs. Food security is one of the five priority climate service areas that have been identified in CSSP China, so this activity will be linked to other work being carried out in the project. This includes using climate model simulations to assess the current climate risk to maize production (https://iopscience.iop.org/article/10.1088/1748-9326/aa6cb9/meta), and forecasting of crop yield.
 

CHN19/2: Attribution of climate change over China and verification of models used for attribution studies

Understanding the causes of climate-related extreme events and the likely increase or decrease in the risk of these in future is essential in order to provide information for policy makers charged with making provision for the adaptation of society to climate change.  A number of attribution studies have already been performed successfully within the framework of CSSP China.  Current and recent work in the project includes the attribution of changes in temperature extremes and humidity under climate change, investigation of how these changes are affecting humans in China, the attribution of changes in the intensity and distribution of precipitation, and the effect land use change on climate extremes.


The objectives for this activity are to conduct validation of models used for attribution studies, with a particular focus on circulation characteristics, and perform further attribution studies related to climate change in China.  
 

CHN19/3: Aerosol effects on Chinese regional climate dynamics

Natural and anthropogenic aerosols can produce large changes in the atmosphere and oceans that have implications for many years. In addition to modifying climate variability, aerosol emissions can also impact air quality with detrimental impacts for human health.

This call is focused on developing our understanding of:
i. the role of aerosol forcing on atmospheric circulation and regional climate to improve the skill of decadal predictions and reduce uncertainty in long-term projections
ii. the impacts of aerosols and regional climate dynamics on air quality and the potential for long range predictions of air quality over East Asia

Modelling and observational work on the consequences of anthropogenic aerosols (emitted from both local and remote sources) for East Asian climate variability, air quality and extremes are in scope. As is the role of natural volcanic aerosols.
 

CHN19/4: Dynamics of East Asian monsoon variability and climate change

The East Asian summer and winter monsoon systems are responsible for a large proportion of regional annual rainfall over a relatively short time period. Changes in the monsoon dynamics (e.g. onset timing, duration, intensity) can have key impacts on agriculture, renewable energy production and drought/flood risk.

This activity will explore, using theoretical understanding and numerical climate model simulations, the dynamics of the East Asian monsoon and how this will be modified under climate change. The aim of this work should be to improve our confidence in climate change projections over
this important region.

In order to deliver this, a series of focussed and complimentary parallel activities are anticipated, for example: novel experiments using simple climate models and detailed analysis of the latest generation of climate
projections (e.g. CMIP6).
 

CHN19/5: Indian and Pacific Ocean decadal variability, climate change and teleconnections to China

Sea surface temperature (SST) in the Pacific and Indian Ocean exhibits pronounced interannual to multi-decadal variability. Such ocean variability has an influence, via atmospheric teleconnections, on regional climate variability over continental East Asia. However, the dynamical mechanisms for these teleconnections to East Asia are poorly understood.

This call is focussed on developing our understanding of:
i. the drivers (internal and/or external) of interannual to multi-decadal climate variability in the Indian and Pacific Oceans with a view to improved prediction skill
ii. the simulation of low frequency teleconnections from Indian and Pacific Ocean variability to East Asian continental climate, with a view to improved climate predictions/services over this region

This activity will focus on improving our understanding of
climate variability and change on multi-year timescales.
 

CHN19/6: The impact of climate change on water resources in China

Climate change and rapid economic development, in combination with frequent droughts and floods, make water resource management a challenging task for China. This activity aims to provide an integrated assessment of current water resources and potential future changes in China. Research is expected to combine atmospheric water cycle with land hydrology, river flows and glaciers to support climate service in water resource management and climate change adaptation.

CHN19/7: Predicting future climate extremes in China

Global warming is driving the intensification of climate extremes, including heat waves, extreme precipitation, super storms etc. However, current climate models have limited success in reproducing observed climate extremes, partially due to coarse model resolution. Improving risk assessment of future climate extremes, its intensity, frequency and geographical distribution, requires novel methods to best utilise latest climate model projections. This call is aimed at scientists who are keen to combine existing scientific knowledge with exploring novel new methods to produce tailored information supporting climate services in China.

CHN19/8: Air-sea interactions, tropical-extratropical teleconnections and model errors in the East Asian monsoon

Many global-climate models exhibit similar biases in east Asian summer monsoon (EASM) rainfall and circulation patterns, including:
· dry biases over the Maritime Continent;
· rainfall, circulation and sea surface temperature biases in the western Pacific;
· a dry (or missing) subtropical monsoon rain band over east Asia.

These errors impact the seasonal cycle and interannual variability. Moreover, the response of the monsoon to anthropogenic forcing is affected by errors in the present-day mean state, which undermines the use of climate projections for east Asia.

Although hypotheses exist for the physical mechanisms which contribute to these biases (e.g. tropical heating rates, tropical-extratropical teleconnections, air-sea interactions, ocean-model errors), there has been relatively little progress towards reducing these biases in climate models and any steps towards a model configuration which did so would be a significant achievement.
 

CHN19/9: aerosol-cloud-land interactions over east Asia and their effects on regional climates

Aerosols modify regional energy and water cycles via their effects on radiation and clouds. Natural and human-induced changes in land-cover can affect atmospheric composition, and aerosols and rainfall can modify land surface conditions. Such interactions can occur on a range of time and spatial scales and are not well understood.

Prominent examples that are relevant to east Asia include:
· feedback of mineral dust emissions on droughts and floods in semi-arid environments
· effect of aerosols on the initiation and development of convective storms, and their subsequent downstream hydrological impact
· interactions between the biosphere, urbanization and atmospheric composition during extreme air-quality events
· the effects of land surface conditions and aerosols on sub-seasonal and seasonal predictability of the east Asian monsoon

Resolving these, or similar effects, requires complex models with coupling between prognostic atmospheric chemistry, aerosols, clouds and land-surface schemes. Such models are relatively new and there is a need to better quantify the ‘costs-versus-benefits' of additional model complexity in order to better inform the development of regional environmental-prediction systems and Earth system models.

CHN19/10: development of an improved urban-environment scheme in global and regional models

Recent studies have indicated that urbanisation in some parts of China may have significantly affected extremes of rainfall and temperature. The attribution of these historical trends to physical mechanisms requires realistic models for urban environments and their interactions with the atmosphere. In addition, Chinese cities are often situated in topographically complex locations, and the interactions of local meteorology (e.g. land-sea or mountain-valley breezes) should be accounted for when investigating the city-scale modification of weather patterns by urbanisation. The effects of inland water and the aerodynamic effects of very tall buildings also potentially need to be accounted for in models. These factors are potential deficiencies of land-surface models which this call seeks to investigate and address.

CHN19/11: The dynamics of tropical cyclones during and after land fall

Tropical cyclones (TCs) are the most destructive and costly climate extremes affecting east Asia. They are imperfectly represented by the current generation of weather and climate models, due in part to the  complexity of the physical processes which govern their dynamics and evolution. This limits the usefulness of projections of the future risks associated with tropical cyclones. Of particular interest are land-falling cases, particularly over complex terrains and urban surfaces, where storms can interact with surface effects (e.g., topographic uplift, thermal contrasts) and regional circulations (e.g., low-level jets, frontal boundaries, colder air masses) to determine regionally specific patterns of hazards and associated risks.

Moreover, many of east Asia's most destructive historical storms have been 'typhoon remnants' which have travelled large distances inland. The processes underpinning such storms are highly uncertain, and the ability of models to simulate them is not well understood.
 

CHN19/12: Climate-driven staple crop production variability and commodity price response

CSSP China is undertaking a broad range of applied science research that explores the impacts of climate variability and change through the different contexts of climate-sensitive sectors in China, including energy, water, food and urban environments. The methods and techniques developed through of this translational research aim to enhance the delivery of climate information from providers to users, and increase its uptake in order to maximise societal benefit by supporting robust decision making. Additionally, the co-development of prototype (non-operational) climate services is allowing pull through of the scientific capability developed in CSSP China and providing demonstrations of the potential value of climate information in decision-making. Further work is required to improve our understanding of the ways in which climate variability and change can affect food security in China, both in the present and future.

The aim of this project is to explore the diverse influences of climate variability/change and global market dynamics on food prices in China, and their impact on food security in China. In turn, this will provide an interpretation of impacts associated with climate variability and change through the context of food security in China.

CHN19/13: Food system mapping and climate sensitivity, with focus on livestock and marine contributions

CSSP China is undertaking a broad range of applied science research that explores the impacts of climate variability and change through the different contexts of climate-sensitive sectors in China, including energy, water, food and urban environments. The methods and techniques developed through of this translational research aim to enhance the delivery of climate information from providers to users, and increase its uptake in order to maximise societal benefit by supporting robust decision making. Additionally, the co-development of prototype (non-operational) climate services is allowing pull through of the scientific capability developed in CSSP China and providing demonstrations of the potential value of climate information in decision-making. Further work is required to improve our understanding of the ways in which climate variability and change can affect food security in China, both in the present and future.

The aim of this project is to explore and map the marine catch and livestock farming components of China’s food system. This will build our understanding of how these components, including imports and exports, contribute to the local and national food system, as well as assessing their sensitivities to weather and climate which will inform a deeper understanding of risks to food security in China. In turn, this will provide an interpretation of impacts associated with climate variability and change through the context of food security in China.


Background on the Newton Fund WCSSP Programme
The Newton Fund builds research and innovation partnerships with 17 active partner countries to support their economic development and social welfare, and to develop their research and innovation capacity for long-term sustainable growth. It has a total UK Government investment of £735 million up until 2021, with matched resources from the partner countries.  
 
The Newton Fund is managed by the UK Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy (BEIS), and delivered through 7 UK delivery partners, which includes UK Research and Innovation (comprising the 7 research councils and Innovate UK), the UK Academies, the British Council and the Met Office. For further information visit the Newton Fund website (www.newtonfund.ac.uk) and follow via Twitter: @NewtonFund  
 
The Met Office is administering the Newton Fund through under the wider Weather and Climate Science for Service Partnership Programme (WCSSP). The WCSSP Programme is developing a global network of projects that harness the scientific expertise needed to strengthen the resilience of vulnerable communities to weather and climate variability. This network accelerates our scientific understanding of the challenges presented by a changing and changeable climate and strengthens our shared ability to develop innovative services that reduce, or manage, societies’ exposure – creating a ‘global community around a shared challenge’. 

For more information see the programme website and follow via Twitter: @MetOfficeww 


Eligibility
The following criteria must be met by the organisation submitting a bid against Calls supported by the Newton Fund in order to be eligible to apply or be awarded funds against this Call: 
• Demonstrate how the Bid contributes to the Newton Fund aim to develop science and innovation partnerships. 
• Demonstrate ODA compliance. 
• Must be a UK operating and registered organisation. 
• Consortium bids are eligible; a lead partner must be nominated for payment and agreement purposes and must be a UK operating and registered organisation. Details of all consortium members must be provided. 
• Funding can only be used to fund new activity for the costs incurred. 
• An in-country economic and societal benefit must be demonstrated. 
• The activity must last the full duration of the Grant Award Term specified. 
• There must be a willingness to work with Authority and other organisations and individuals associated with the WCSSP Programme. 
• Be willing to work with other funding authorities to ensure delivery costs represent the most efficient use of resources to deliver the overall Programme over the Grant Award Term. 
• Bidders are not expected to have in-country Partners to respond to this call. The bilateral partnership nature of the Newton Fund means that effort by in-country researchers is supported by our existing in-country partners as standard.

How to Apply:

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Online Discussions between Bidders and the Met Office: 
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