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CSSP China research opportunities

Calls for research grant applications are now closed. More information on calls is available via the Met Office tenders portal.

CLOSED CALLS

There are currently no research grant opportunities open under the Climate Science for Service Partnership China.

Aerosols and regional climate dynamics

Call closed on 29 March 2018

Submissions were sought on work to understand the dynamical mechanisms and predictability of East Asian climate.

East Asian climate is affected by low frequency variability from months to years ahead.  This variability is driven by dynamical processes and their interaction with radiative effects, for example from atmospheric aerosols and increasing greenhouse gases.  Aspects of the dynamics of regional climate, including global teleconnections and predictability, are therefore key research topics. These aspects need to be better understood from an observational, theoretical and computer modelling perspective if we are to improve regional climate predictions and long term climate projections.

Attribution of extreme events and human impacts

Call closed on 29 March 2018

Submissions were sought on attribution of the likely causes of climate-related extreme events in the East Asian region and looking at how the risk of these events is evolving with climate change, and their impact of these events on humans, for example on health and livelihood.

The frequency and severity of extreme events, such as droughts, floods and heat waves is changing as a result of human-induced climate change. Such events have a profound impact on humans, both directly, for example through increased mortality, and indirectly, for example through impacts on food production and water resources. The objective of this call is to attribute the likely causes of climate-related extreme events in the East Asian region, how the risk of these events is evolving with climate change, and their impact on humans, for example on health and livelihood.

Land-Atmosphere Interactions and Processes

Call closed on 29 March 2018

Submissions were sought on the study of one aspect of coupled model capability in East Asian climates, namely land-atmosphere interactions and land-surface processes.

Global coupled climate models are a key underpinning component in developing climate services at seasonal-decadal timescales and for climate projections. While these models have demonstrated skilful predictions over East Asia, they still suffer from robust systematic errors in mean state and climate variability that potentially limit their capability.

Predictability of Regional Climate

Call closed on 29 March 2018

Submissions were sought on work to understand the dynamical mechanisms and predictability of East Asian climate under CSSP China.

East Asian climate is affected by low frequency variability from months to years ahead.  This variability is driven by dynamical processes and their interaction with radiative effects, for example from atmospheric aerosols and increasing greenhouse gases.  Aspects of the dynamics of regional climate, including global teleconnections and predictability, are therefore key research topics. These aspects need to be better understood from an observational, theoretical and computer modelling perspective if we are to improve regional climate predictions and long term climate projections. 

Regional Water Cycle

Call closed on 29 March 2018

Submissions were sought on work to inform risk assessment and climate model performance for regional drought, floods and water resources.

Regional water cycle has a strong societal impact on social and economical development in China and East Asia as a whole, given the frequent occurrence of drought, floods and increasing demands on water resources. Improved knowledge of water cycle processes and their limitations in current climate models would greatly benefit seasonal to decadal climate services as well as climate change impact assessment and policy makers for planning and water resources management. This will only be possible if model representation of water cycle processes is critically examined and improved.

To find out more, visit the Met Office tenders portal.

 

 

 

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