Dandelion clock blowing in the wind

What does this forecast mean?

Weather symbols

Clear night

Clear night

Sunny day

Sunny day

Partly cloudy (night)

Partly cloudy (night)

Sunny intervals

Sunny intervals

Mist

Mist

Fog

Fog

Cloudy

Cloudy

Overcast

Overcast

Light rain shower (night)

Light rain shower (night)

Light rain shower (day)

Light rain shower (day)

Drizzle

Drizzle

Light rain

Light rain

Heavy rain shower (night)

Heavy rain shower (night)

Heavy rain shower (day)

Heavy rain shower (day)

Heavy rain

Heavy rain

Sleet shower (night)

Sleet shower (night)

Sleet shower (day)

Sleet shower (day)

Sleet

Sleet

Hail shower (night)

Hail shower (night)

Hail shower (day)

Hail shower (day)

Hail

Hail

Light snow shower (night)

Light snow shower (night)

Light snow shower (day)

Light snow shower (day)

Light snow

Light snow

Heavy snow shower (night)

Heavy snow shower (night)

Heavy snow shower (day)

Heavy snow shower (day)

Heavy snow

Heavy snow

Thunder shower (night)

Thunder shower (night)

Thunder shower (day)

Thunder shower (day)

Thunder

Thunder

 

Chance of precipitation

For example, a 70% chance of rain represents a 7 in 10 chance that precipitation will fall at some during that period.

Represents how likely it is that rain (or other precipitation: sleet, snow, hail, drizzle etc.) will fall from the sky during a certain time period.

Temperature

The number in the coloured bars represents the air temperature in the units selected in Settings (Celsius or Fahrenheit)

Feels like

Feels like temperature takes into account wind speed and humidity to give a more representative indication of how the temperature will feel.

Wind direction and speed

Wind direction illustrates the direction in which the wind is blowing from. This is signified in the forecast table by an arrow and compass directions, such as SSW (south southwest), NW (north west) and E (east). Wind speed refers to the average speed over a given period.

Wind gust

Wind gusts are a rapid but brief increase in strength of the wind relative to the wind speed at the time.

UV

UV
INDEX

UV
SUMMARY 
EXPOSURE
CATEGORY
  No significant UV
UV index 1 (low)   UV index 2 (low) UV low Low
UV index 3 (medium) UV index 4 (medium) UV index 5 (medium)                               UV medium Moderate
UV index 6 (high) UV index 7 (high) UV high High
 UV index 8 (very high) UV index 9 (very high) UV index 10 (very high) UV very high Very high
UV index 11 (extreme) UV extreme

Extreme

No data No data

Air pollution

Symbol  Category 
No significant pollution
Low
Moderate
High
Very high
No data No data

Pollen

Symbol  Category 
No significant pollen
Low
Moderate
High

Very high

No data No data

 

Pressure symbols

 

Cold Front

The leading edge of an advancing colder air mass. Its passage is usually marked by cloud and precipitation, followed by a drop in temperature and/or humidity.

Warm Front

The leading edge of an advancing warmer air mass, the passage of which commonly brings cloud and precipitation followed by increasing temperature and/or humidity.

Occluded front (or 'occlusion')

Occlusions form when the cold front of a depression catches up with the warm front, lifting the warm air between the fronts into a narrow wedge above the surface. Occluded fronts bring cloud and precipitation.

Developing cold/warm front (frontogenesis)

Represents a front that is forming due to increase in temperature gradient at the surface.

Weakening cold/warm front (frontolysis)

Represents a front that is losing its identity, usually due to rising pressure. Cloud and precipitation becomes increasingly fragmented.

Upper cold/warm front

Upper fronts represent the boundaries between air masses at levels above the surface. For instance, the passage of an upper warm front may bring warmer air at an altitude of 10,000 ft, without bringing a change of air mass at the surface.

Quasi-stationary front

A stationary or slow-moving boundary between two air masses. Cloud and precipitation are usually associated.

Isobars

Contours of equal mean sea-level pressure (MSLP), measured in hectopascals (hPa). MSLP maxima (anticyclones) and minima (depressions) are marked by the letters H (High) and L (Low) on weather charts.

Thickness lines

Pressure decreases with altitude, and thickness measures the difference in height between two standard pressure levels in the atmosphere. It is proportional to the mean temperature of this layer of air, so is a useful way of describing the temperature of an airmass.

Weather charts commonly show contour lines of 1,000-500 hPa thickness, which represent the depth (in decametres, where 1 dam = 10 m) of the layer between the 1,000 hPa and 500 hPa pressure levels. Cold, polar air has low thickness, and values of 528 dam or less frequently bring snow to the UK. Conversely, warm, tropical air has high thickness, and values in excess of 564 dam across the UK often indicate a heatwave.

Trough

An elongated area of relatively low surface pressure. The troughs marked on weather charts may also represent an area of low thickness (thickness trough), or a perturbation in the upper troposphere (upper trough). All are associated with increasing cloud and risk of precipitation.

Convergence line

A slow-moving trough, which is often parallel to the isobars and tends to be persistent over many hours. They are quite common in cold northerly outbreaks down the Irish Sea, affecting west Wales, Devon and Cornwall in particular, but can be found in other areas also. This convergence line can give hours of persistent precipitation over very localised areas, whilst a few miles down the road it is relatively dry, leading to some heavy snowfall/rainfall. In summer the convergence lines are not as easy to forecast, but then can still occur due to sea-breeze convergence, and are over the land, whilst in winter they are over the sea.