Mountain weather

Brecon Beacons

There may be weather warnings in force for the UK

Brecon Beacons Mountain weather forecast table

Confidence

High confidence for overall story. Low confidence on the formation of low cloud on Wednesday evening and, again, on Thursday evening. Moderate confidence on the arrival and clearance of rain on Thursday morning, and the risk of thunderstorms on Thursday afternoon.

This evening forecast

Sunrise:
Sunset:

A drier evening after this afternoon's rain. A moderate risk for an occasional rain shower during the first parts of the evening. Summits are likely to remain cloud free through the period, but there is a low chance for low cloud developing from 2100 onwards shrouding high ground, especially southern faces, above 1500 ft amsl.

Sunrise:
Sunset:
Mountain hazards

Mountain weather hazards

Hazards apply at or above 300m, reflecting the more severe conditions which can occur at altitude.

hazard Heavy persistent rain
Heavy and persistent rain can lead to drenched clothing and footwear with waterproofs often becoming soaked through, especially if accompanied by strong winds. This can lead to significant loss of body heat and an increased likelihood of hypothermia. Terrain may turn increasingly boggy underfoot while streams can flood and become impassable. There may also be a risk of flooding in valleys or glens. If there is snow cover, a heightened avalanche hazard is possible and avalanche reports should be consulted where available.

hazard Poor visibility
Poor visibility presents challenging route finding conditions. Visibility could be significantly less than 50 metres in all directions with few or no visual references, especially on featureless moors or plateaux. Distances become hard to judge and cliff or cornice edges can be difficult to recognise. These conditions require good navigational skills. There is a risk of white-out conditions when mist or fog is combined with extensive snow cover.
hazard Thunderstorms
Lightning is a significant mountain hazard which can result in serious injury or death. Mountain terrain often leaves one highly exposed to lightning strikes. Hail may give unpleasant conditions with torrential rain and localised flash flooding also possible, mainly in Summer months.

Mountain weather forecast

Sunshine and showers, after early rain clears.

Wind direction and speed (mph)
Altitude above mean sea level
Wind gust (mph)
Altitude above mean sea level

Altitude above mean sea level

Altitude above mean sea level

Additional weather information

Weather

Dry and partially cloudy through the first part of the morning, before rain, heavy at times, is expected to arrive across the Brecon Beacons a few hours before sunrise. Rain soon clearing after dawn. Scattered showers developing quite widely by mid-morning. Sunny spells and scattered showers persisting into the afternoon when there will be a moderate chance for the occasional heavy and thundery shower with hail. Showers dissipating through Thursday evening. A moderate risk of low cloud developing over summits, giving reduced visibility, later on Thursday night.

Chance of cloud-free mountain/hill tops at 600m

70% lowering to 40% by 0400 BST. Chance of cloud free summits becoming 100% by 0900 BST before lowering to 70% again by 2300 BST.

Visibility

Generally good or very good, but poor or very poor in cloud, and heavy rain or showers.

Meteorologist's view

April showers: Thursday's weather will be dominated by a returning polar maritime air mass across the region with low pressure to the west, over Ireland. A combination of daytime heating and the proximal low pressure will aid the development of showers across Wales and the Brecon Beacons. Daytime heating will enable the formation of cumulonimbus clouds and these may give some heavy spells of rain with the risk of hail and thunder during the afternoon. Summit winds are likely to be a touch stronger than the values given for 600 M.

Recent rainfall

Location: Neuadd (Near Pontsticill)
Altitude: 353m
Last 24 hoursLast 48 hoursLast 72 hours
11.6mm11.6mm11.6mm
Measurement date:

Rainfall data provided by Natural Resources Wales. The Met Office is not responsible for content provided by third parties and may remove this data without warning.

Sunrise:
Sunset:

Mountain weather information

Weather

Dry with a risk of cloud forming over the summits. Rain expected to arrive for Friday morning and then clear for the afternoon. Another band of rain is expected for Friday evening.

Chance of cloud-free mountain/hill tops at 600m

60% increasing to 90% by 0900 BST. Lowering to 60% in rain on Friday afternoon. Increasing to 90% from 1600 BST. Then lowering to 40% by 2200 BST.

Maximum wind speed expected

Southerly to southeasterly 25 mph gust gusting 30 mph, becoming southwesterly mean 20-25 mph gusting 30-35 mph by midday.

Temperature

  • At 600m Plus 2 Celsius becoming Plus 5 Celsius.
  • Valley Plus 5 Celsius becoming Plus 15 Celsius.
  • Freezing level Above summits.

Visibility

Generally good or very good, but poor or very poor in cloud. Moderate to poor in rain or drizzle.

Mountain weather information

Saturday 27 April

Sunrise:
Sunset:

Strong westerly or northwesterly winds with gales over summits. Winds easing during the evening. Rain or showers through daylight hours accompanied by overcast cloud and risk of cloud over summits. Freezing level above summits.

Sunday 28 April

Sunrise:
Sunset:

A dry day with some sunny spells, but rain expected by the evening. Freezing level above summits.

Monday 29 April

Sunrise:
Sunset:

Light winds. Overcast cloud for much of the day giving some persistent rain. Summits shrouded by cloud. Freezing level well above summits.

Updated at:

Summit specific forecast map

Summit specific forecasts for Brecon Beacons

The summits of each peak form a long ridge with four of the peaks forming a horseshoe shape around the head of the Taf Fechan River which flows away to the south-east. The Brecon Beacons is said to be named after the ancient practice of lighting signal fires (beacons) on mountains to warn of attacks by invaders, or more recently to commemorate public and national events such as coronations or the Millennium.

For ardent mountain climbers, the Brecon Beacons National Park is among the best that Britain has to offer. While it doesn't have some of the headline-grabbing peaks of Snowdonia or the Scottish Highlands, it fits scores of slightly smaller mountains into its relatively compact 519 square mile area. These include the area's highest peak, Pen y Fan, as well as the marginally smaller Corn Du (873 metres). Both offer rather hospitable, anvil-shaped summits to those who reach the top, with plenty of space for rest and photographs, before tackling the descent.