Mountain weather

Lake District

There may be weather warnings in force for the UK

Lake District Mountain weather forecast table

Confidence

High for mainly dry and generally settled conditions into next week, but Medium confidence for cloud amounts and for possibility of rain Sunday and Monday.

This evening forecast

Sunrise:
Sunset:

Clear spells and a frost developing, but perhaps the odd snow shower with light east or northeast winds

Sunrise:
Sunset:
Mountain hazards

Mountain weather hazards

Hazards apply at or above 300m, reflecting the more severe conditions which can occur at altitude.

hazard Severe chill effect
Wind significantly lowers the ‘feels-like’ temperature relative to the actual temperature, with even moderate winds significantly adding to the chilling effect. Strong winds can result in a severe and debilitating wind chill many degrees below the actual temperature. This effect will be enhanced in rain or wet snow. Without protection, prolonged exposure could result in frost nip or frostbite on exposed parts of the body and/or hypothermia.
hazard Strong sunlight
Harmful UV levels from sunlight increase with altitude giving a greater risk of sunburn and eye damage, even on some overcast days. On breezy days, the cooling effect of wind on exposed skin may disguise any feeling of sunburn until it is too late. If there is snow cover, glare increases the effect of UV rays especially on the eyes. It is advisable to wear sun block, protective clothing such as a long-sleeved top and hat and have good quality eye protection.

Mountain weather forecast

Generally fine with sunny spells, but perhaps the odd snow shower.

Wind direction and speed (mph)
Altitude above mean sea level
Wind gust (mph)
Altitude above mean sea level

Altitude above mean sea level

Altitude above mean sea level

Additional weather information

Meteorologist's view

Air a good deal colder than recently, but feeling quite pleasant and relatively warm on lower slopes in the sunshine, with light winds, but a marked chill effect at height.

Weather

Long clear spells overnight with a frost and perhaps some freezing fog developing in the dales. Then a chilly, frosty start, but any freezing fog will lift in morning then dry and mostly sunny, but a bit cloudier in the afternoon with perhaps the odd snow shower. Clear spells in evening and frost soon returning.

Chance of cloud-free mountain/hill tops at 800m

80% or more

Visibility

Very good, but very poor in any early fog and occasionally poor at height, with patchy cloud above 600-800m

Ground conditions

Date: Thursday 4 March 2021. Location: Helvellyn summit at 11:00 Full report: We are continuing to provide the Fell Top Reports for people undertaking their daily local exercise during the lockdown. We would like to remind everyone that Government guidance stipulates that people should only exercise locally to where they live. Summit temperatures are once again below freezing with rime ice forming down to 800m and Red Tarn was almost fully frozen. The vast majority of the Lake District fells are now clear of snow but the rime ice and a few areas of verglas on the summits mean that conditions underfoot remain tricky and microspikes were very useful today. With careful route choice Striding and Swirral Edges can now both be climbed without setting foot on snow although there is still rime and verglas to contend with. However it's essential for anyone who does venture onto the few remaining patches of snow to be fully kitted out with an ice axe and crampons as it has now refrozen and the surface is bullet hard and icy. This hazard is generally to be found above 850m in sheltered spots and hollows and on predominantly steep north and east facing aspects. Despite the spring like conditions in the valleys and the lack of snow, winter is still very much in evidence on the fells and walkers should go equipped with plenty of warm and waterproof layers, hats & gloves, a reliable method of navigating, food & fluid and some emergency kit including a survival bag, whistle and headtorch. Please be conservative with your plans and know both your limits and also when to turn back. Temperature: minus 1.6 C, Maximum wind speed 20.5 mph, Wind chill: minus 9.7 C, Average wind speed: 15.9 mph

Sunrise:
Sunset:

Mountain weather information

Weather

Frosty start with isolated freezing fog patches in the dales, then dry and bright with sunny spells

Chance of cloud-free mountain/hill tops at 800m

90%

Maximum wind speed expected

South or southwest, turning westerly, 5-10mph

Temperature

  • At 800m Minus 3 C
  • Valley Zero to minus 3 C rising to plus 6 C by day
  • Freezing level At all levels, but rising to 400m in afternoon

Visibility

Good or very good after any early fog, with only patchy cloud around 700 or 800m

Mountain weather information

Sunday 7 March

Sunrise:
Sunset:

Another chilly, but mostly dry and bright start, though cloudier and cloud will likely thicken enough to bring a little rain at times. Winds turning southwest and freshening later. Freezing level rising to 800m.

Monday 8 March

Sunrise:
Sunset:

Cloudy with outbreaks of light rain, though falling as snow on the tops in morning hill fog becoming extensive. Fresh or strong southwest winds and freezing level rising above the tops in afternoon.

Tuesday 9 March

Sunrise:
Sunset:

Cloudy with extensive hill fog and patchy rain, but heavier, more persistent rain later. Southwest winds strengthening, gales developing over tops in afternoon. Freezing level near summits at first then rising.

Updated at:

Scafell Pike is the highest mountain in England. From its summit, the view spans from the Mourne Mountains in Northern Ireland to Snowdonia in Wales. The Lake District also contains the deepest and longest lakes in England; Wastwater and Windermere.

Much smaller than its Scottish counterparts, but no less breathtaking, is the Lake District National Park. While unarguably most famous for the lakes and waters from which it took its name, the National Park certainly has plenty to offer climbers as well. Not only that, special routes have been created (known as Miles Without Stiles) to offer more laid back, moderate walks.

Those looking for a challenge are suitably catered for with the Lakeland Fells, as made famous by rambler and cartographer Alfred Wainwright. These include some of the highest peaks in England: Scafell Pike (978 metres), Scafell (965 metres), Helvellyn (951 metres) and Skiddaw (931 metres).