Mountain weather

Mourne Mountains

There may be weather warnings in force for the UK

Mourne Mountains Mountain weather forecast table

Confidence

High confidence for continued wintery weather on Thursday and becoming more settled after this.

This evening forecast

Sunrise:
Sunset:

A few snow showers this evening with strong northwesterly winds.

Sunrise:
Sunset:
Mountain hazards

Mountain weather hazards

Hazards apply at or above 300m, reflecting the more severe conditions which can occur at altitude.

hazard Gales
Gale force winds (gusts over 50mph) make walking difficult and strenuous with a potential to be blown over by gusts. There is often a marked increase in winds through cols or on exposed ridges and summits. Distances can take longer to cover and compass bearings become harder to follow accurately.
hazard Severe chill effect
Wind significantly lowers the ‘feels-like’ temperature relative to the actual temperature, with even moderate winds significantly adding to the chilling effect. Strong winds can result in a severe and debilitating wind chill many degrees below the actual temperature. This effect will be enhanced in rain or wet snow. Without protection, prolonged exposure could result in frost nip or frostbite on exposed parts of the body and/or hypothermia.

hazard Poor visibility
Poor visibility presents challenging route finding conditions. Visibility could be significantly less than 50 metres in all directions with few or no visual references, especially on featureless moors or plateaux. Distances become hard to judge and cliff or cornice edges can be difficult to recognise. These conditions require good navigational skills. There is a risk of white-out conditions when mist or fog is combined with extensive snow cover.

Mountain weather forecast

Outbreaks of snow during the day, westerly gales or severe gales and a significant wind chill.

Wind direction and speed (mph)
Altitude above mean sea level
Wind gust (mph)
Altitude above mean sea level

Altitude above mean sea level

Altitude above mean sea level

Additional weather information

Meteorologist's view

Gale or severe gale force gusts on the summits in the morning with a severe wind chill likely.

Weather

A few sleet and snow showers will continue overnight but will become less frequent by dawn with a few drier periods. Blustery wintery showers during the day but a few brighter spells too. Gales or severe gales will make it feel bitterly cold on the hills. Mainly dry by early evening with a few clearer spells developing.

Chance of cloud-free mountain/hill tops at 700m

60-70% scattered cloud will fall below the summits at times.

Visibility

Generally poor visibility in wintery showers, visibility will be good outwith showers in the afternoon.

Sunrise:
Sunset:

Mountain weather information

Weather

A mixture of sunshine and blustery wintery showers and feeling very cold.

Chance of cloud-free mountain/hill tops at 700m

60-70% still some low cloud associated with showers.

Maximum wind speed expected

Westerly 20-25mph with gusts 30-35mph.

Temperature

  • At 700m Minus 2 Celsius.
  • Valley Zero rising to plus 4 Celsius.
  • Freezing level 300m

Visibility

Although the main cloud bases will be above the summits there will be scattered cloud falling below the tops to a base around 600m at times. Visibility may become poor or very poor in any heavier wintery showers.

Mountain weather information

Saturday 23 January

Sunrise:
Sunset:

Mainly dry with sunny intervals and fresh northwesterly winds. Freezing level around 200m.

Sunday 24 January

Sunrise:
Sunset:

Another pleasant winters day with some long sunny intervals, although there is the risk of a few wintery showers. Fresh westerly winds. Freezing level around 400m

Monday 25 January

Sunrise:
Sunset:

A dry day with lots of winter sunshine and very light westerly winds, still feeling cold.

Updated at:

The Mourne Mountains include the highest mountains in Northern Ireland; the highest of these is Slieve Donard standing at 850 metres at the northeastern edge of the Mournes, overlooking Newcastle and Dundrum Bay. At the summit of Slieve Donard there is a cairn and a small stone tower, which is part of the Mourne Wall, which passes over the mountain’s southern and western shoulders.

The Mourne Wall is a 35 kilometre dry stone wall that crosses fifteen summits, constructed between 1904 and 1922 by the Belfast Water Commissioners to define and enclose the catchment area for the newly constructed Silent Valley Reservoir.v