Mountain weather

South Grampian and Southeast Highlands

There may be weather warnings in force for the UK

South Grampian and Southeast Highlands Mountain weather forecast table

Confidence

High for the rather showery weather over the next few days with fairly light winds, lower for shower and cloud detail, and for the general weather on Monday and Tuesday.

This evening forecast

Sunrise:
Sunset:

Any remaining showers dying out by mid evening but staying cloudy with some hill fog,

Sunrise:
Sunset:
Mountain hazards

Mountain weather hazards

Hazards apply at or above 300m, reflecting the more severe conditions which can occur at altitude.

hazard Poor visibility
Poor visibility presents challenging route finding conditions. Visibility could be significantly less than 50 metres in all directions with few or no visual references, especially on featureless moors or plateaux. Distances become hard to judge and cliff or cornice edges can be difficult to recognise. These conditions require good navigational skills. There is a risk of white-out conditions when mist or fog is combined with extensive snow cover.
hazard Strong sunlight
Harmful UV levels from sunlight increase with altitude giving a greater risk of sunburn and eye damage, even on some overcast days. On breezy days, the cooling effect of wind on exposed skin may disguise any feeling of sunburn until it is too late. If there is snow cover, glare increases the effect of UV rays especially on the eyes. It is advisable to wear sun block, protective clothing such as a long-sleeved top and hat and have good quality eye protection.

Mountain weather forecast

A mainly dry start, hill fog, then a few showers. Light winds.

Wind direction and speed (mph)
Altitude above mean sea level
Wind gust (mph)
Altitude above mean sea level

Altitude above mean sea level

Altitude above mean sea level

Additional weather information

Met Office Aberdeen meteorologist's view

Nothing extra

Weather

Overcast overnight and into the with hill fog and some patchy light rain or drizzle. Cloud lifting up off the hills by afternoon, perhaps a few breaks allowing sunny intervals and just the odd light shower breaking out, wintry above 1100m. Staying cloudy with some hill fog reforming by the evening.

Chance of cloud-free mountain/hill tops at 800m

20% until mid morning and again in evening but 80% for a time in afternoon.

Visibility

Away from cloud, moderate or good, briefly poor at first in drizzle. Cloud: occasional at 600-750m and above at first and later, otherwise near or above tops.

Sunrise:
Sunset:

Mountain weather information

Weather

A mainly dry day with just the odd light shower in the afternoon.

Chance of cloud-free mountain/hill tops at 800m

30% at first rising to 80% by mid morning.

Maximum wind speed expected

East or southeast 15 gusts 25mph.

Temperature

  • At 800m Plus 6 Celsius
  • Glen Plus 12 Celsius
  • Freezing level Above the summits.

Visibility

Generally good away from cloud. Very poor in early hill fog, cloud at 500-800m is likely at first before bases rise above the tops.

Mountain weather information

Sunday 16 May

Sunrise:
Sunset:

A dry bright start then some heavy showers breaking out by the afternoon, dying out in the evening. Mostly light winds.

Monday 17 May

Sunrise:
Sunset:

Low confidence. The bright, but showery conditions will continue but there is a chance that it will be more generally overcast with some rain, and fresh westerly winds.

Tuesday 18 May

Sunrise:
Sunset:

Staying showery with fresh westerly winds, perhaps wintry on the highest tops.

Updated at:

This weather forecast area covers much of the southern and eastern Cairngorm National Park, the Aberdeenshire hills and Angus hills and includes the Balmoral Estate, Scottish home of the Royal Family since 1852. Lochnagar, with its magnificent northern corrie, is very popular among walkers and climbers and Mount Keen is the most easterly of all Munros (Scottish mountains over 3000 feet).

The Perthshire hills offer a rich variety of heather-clad hills and mighty pine forests. The River Tay flows 120 miles from its source to the North Sea and is the longest and largest river in Scotland. Loch Tay is a freshwater loch and at around 150 metres deep it is one of the deepest in Scotland. At 1,214 metres Ben Lawers is the highest point along the ridge near the north shore of the loch that includes seven Munros.

The Ochil Hills are a long range of steep-sided, round topped hills, stretching 25 miles from the Firth of Tay to Stirling. There are many peaks over 600 metres offering splendid views across central Scotland and to the north, with Ben Cleuch the highest at 721 metres.

For snow and avalanche hazard forecasts please visit Scottish Avalanche Information Service